Swat Situation in Slidell…

Suspect arrested after shots fired in stand-off with SWAT team in Slidell
Suspect arrested after shots fired in stand-off with SWAT team in Slidell
The gunman barricaded himself in his house and became more hostile toward police, the spokesperson said. A SWAT was able to detain the gunman.

SLIDELL, La. — Authorities say shots were fired during a standoff with a SWAT team in Slidell on Monday afternoon.

A man threatening to kill himself and others was holding a weapon when police arrived at the scene, a Slidell Police Department spokesperson said.

Monday morning, police went to the Country Club Subdivision after reports of gunfire in the area, and they found the gunman on Northam Court. They said he was homicidal and suicidal.

The gunman barricaded himself in his house and became more hostile toward police, the spokesperson said. A SWAT team was called to intervene and they were able to detain the gunman.

Slidell Police Chief Randy Fandal said the Slidell community has been dealing with more people who have mental issues or PTSD recently.

“For the fourth time this year, our SWAT team was used to defuse a situation involving a homicidal or suicidal subject,” the police chief said. “Each one of these encounters could have turned deadly, but our officers were able to defuse each situation in the most peaceful manner possible.”

The gunman was treated for minor injuries and had a mental exam, police said. Slidell investigators are working closely with doctors to make sure the gunman receives treatment.

A photo posted on the department’s Facebook page showed several police cars blocking roads in the area.

► Get breaking news from your neighborhood delivered directly to you by downloading the new FREE WWL-TV News app now in the IOS App Store or Google Play.

The Slidell Police Department’s Mounted Division is bringing communi… ty policing / criminal patrol to a whole new level! Officer Robert “Mongo” Crowell, and his horse Misfit, went inside of PetSmart to shop, while Officer Eldon Juneau, and his horse Chesney, stayed outside to watch the parking lot.
Slidell PD SWAT Team Defuses Deadly Situation – Utilize Less-Lethal… Options to Bring Subject into Custody Shortly before 10 a.m. on Monday (December 9, 2019), Slidell Police responded to a report of gunshots on Northam Court, which is located in the Country Club Subdivision.
Unmute

Last Will and Testament…

Louisiana Last Will and Testament

November 26, 2019

Legacy Estate and Elder Law Of Louisiana LLC

“Just calling a document a “Last Will and Testament” does not make it valid under Louisiana law. Louisiana has specific requirements that must be satisfied before a document will be considered a valid Louisiana will. . .”

Under current law, there are only two forms of wills under Louisiana law: the notarial testament and the olographic testament (called a holographic testament in other states). In order for either type of will to be valid, it must either:

  • Meet the requirements of Louisiana law (discussed below);

  • Meet the requirement of the law of the state (other than Louisiana) where the will was executed at the time that the will was executed;

  • Meet the requirements of the law where the testator was domiciled at death or when the will was executed; or

  • If it affects real estate, meet the requirements of the law of the state where the real estate is located.

Either type must be made by the testator (and not be someone else acting on his or her behalf).  Joint wills (e.g., a single will signed by both a husband and a wife) are not permitted.”

To read more, follow the link to Legacy Estate and Elder Law Of Louisiana LLC http://www.mylouisianasuccession.com/louisiana/last-will-and-testament/

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MANDEVILLE NOTARY

Brian J. Rhinehart

712 Carondelet

Mandeville, Louisiana 70448

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St. Tammany Parish Jail Bookings…

BR.policeefficiencies.adv_HS_054 (copy)

jail cell

Nov. 11

SARA JULIET LYONS: 38, 109 Chamale Cove West, Slidell, aggravated burglary, battery, domestic abuse battery.

CHAD RICHARD SKOIEN: 27, 716 Henry Landry Ave., Metairie, operating a vehicle while intoxicated, failure to pay bridge toll, improper lane use, establishing speed zones.

DEONDRE BROWN: 29, 107 Al’s Trailer Park, Gray, fugitive.

JOSHUA GOLDEN: 28, 6352 Farrell Drive, Slidell, violation of protection order.

DAVID JAVIER ZAND: 34, 172 Brigadier Loop, Pearl River, domestic abuse battery.

MARANDA C. ALVAREZ: 28, 810 Armand St., Mandeville, operating a vehicle while intoxicated, improper lane use, establishing speed zones.

Nov. 12

BRENT CARL ACOSTA: 48, 1609 La. 22 West, Madisonville, fugitive.

SHANE MICHAEL PHILMON: 34, 71164 Cutter Place, Abita Springs, drug court sanction.

COTY ROBERT RAINEY: 33, 52387 Turnpike Road, Folsom, fugitive.

HILTON O’NEIL SMITH: 23, 1038 Eight Point Road, Summit, Miss., domestic abuse battery/pregnant victim.

CHRISTAIN ROBERTSON: 21, 309 Drury Lane, Slidell, possession with intent to distribute Schedule I drug, possession of drug paraphernalia.

JENNIFER LYN NAQUIN: 38, 40140 Onyx Ave., Slidell, domestic abuse battery.

GREGORY JOHNSON: 28, 1112 Bird Ave., Bogalusa, refusing to provide correct identity.

BRINDELL J. DORSEY: 28, 2800 Deloes Drive, Monroe, housed for court.

RICHARD THOMAS: 52, 215 Second Street, Pearl River, four counts of possession of Schedule II drug, sale, distribution or possession of legend drug without prescription.

BRANDON SEALS: 26, 406 West Magnolia, Amite, simple burglary, possession of Schedule II drug, possession with intent to distribute of a Schedule I drug, possession with intent to distribute Schedule II drug.

DUANE ANDERSON: 27, 404 B Harding Drive, Hammond, cruelty to juveniles, two counts of simple burglary, illegal possession of stolen things, simple burglary.

DAVONTA ABRON: 27, 914 East Owel, Hammond, hit and run.

TODD FRISBIE: 46, 1147 La. 16, Franklinton, housed for court.

LARRY SMITH: 30, 30873 Old Columbia Road, Franklinton, possession of Schedule I drug, two counts felony theft felony.

RAYMOND MCCLAIN: 51, 44559 Vessier Road, Franklinton, vehicular homicide.

KYLE COCHRANE: 34, 665 North Beau Chene Drive, Mandeville, failure to honor written promise to appear.

JAMES EDWARD LENTZ: 48, 61075 Shady Pine Road, Pearl River, parole violation.

DENNIS CLAY HUNT: 59, 108964 Core Lane, Baker, contempt of court.

KEOCEAN G. CANN: 31, 1731 Penny St., Marrero, contempt of court.

JASON KETCHUM: 34, 76230 La. 1083, Covington, domestic abuse battery/strangulation.

CARLY FICHTER: 33, 31973 Beasley Road, Walker, unauthorized use of motor vehicle.

GARY T. VICKNAIR: 54, 208 Fayedaye Drive, Madisonville, cyberstalking.

Nov. 13

KELROY ROBERTSON: 31, 37168 6th St., Slidell, disturbing the peace by appearing in an intoxicated condition.

COREY MICHAEL GRIFFIN: 32, 105 Frances St., Slidell, possession of Schedule II drug, possession of drug paraphernalia, obstruction of justice.

ANGELA MARTINEZ: 58, 2023 Green Court, Mandeville, DWI first offense, careless operation.

JESSICA GAUNTT: 33, 125 Robinhood Drive, Covington, felony theft felony.

EARL SCOTT: 48, 703 Leboue St., New Orleans, two counts of possession of Schedule I drug.

KEVIN ROBERT BALL: 30, 1038 Ronald Reagan Hwy., Covington, DWI first offense.

STEPHRIC GARRETT: 44, 12139 Hay Hollow Road, Folsom, indecent behavior with a juvenile pornography involving.

LIRYCA NEVILLE: 37, 159 Honeywood Drive, Slidell, filing a false lien against a law enforcement or court, contempt of court.

GAYNIELLE H. NEVILLE: 59, 159 Honeywood Drive, Slidell, forgery, injuring public records, filing a false lien against a law enforcement or court, contempt of court.

FERDINAND BRANCH: 38, 1527 Gause Blvd., Slidell, two counts of contempt of court, forgery, injuring public records, filing a false lien against a law enforcement or court.

SHELTON L. BLACKWELL: 34, 710 Avenue B, Bogalusa, housed for court.

MEGAN MARCUSSEN: 41, 23148 Strain Road, Mandeville, domestic abuse battery.

Nov. 14

JULIUS BROWN: 57, 15456 Tchefuncta Drive, Covington, drug court sanction.

STEPHANIE MATTHEWS: 54, 117 Heather Drive, Slidell, parole violation.

BRANDON JOSE RIMKUS: 29, 25010 Burvant St., Abita Springs, domestic abuse battery.

DAVID JAVIER ZAND: 34, 172 Brigadier Loop, Pearl River, DWI third offense, careless operation, no license on vehicle, driving under suspension, possession of Schedule II drug.

ALLYSA LEMOINE: 22, 61294 Slidell Ave., Slidell, possession of Schedule II drug, possession of Schedule I drug.

CRYSTAL STRATE: 35, 7 Lurline Drive, Covington, DWI first offense, careless operation, driving under suspension.

SETH ALEXANDER HUGHES: 19, 58047 Churchill Road, Slidell, driving too fast for conditions, simple possession marijuana or synthetic cannabis, possession of Schedule IV drug.

CHARLES STALLING: 29, 909 North Pine St., Slidell, parole violation.

JIMMY WOODBURN: 49, 126 Silverwood Drive, Slidell, domestic abuse battery.

KIONA DOMINO: 24, 575 Beechwood Drive, Slidell, simple battery, simple criminal damage less than $1,000.

TRAVIS CRAWFORD: 39, 713 Walnut St., Slidell, three counts of contempt of court.

BLAISE DOMINO: 34, 3833 Karen Place, Chalmette, three counts of contempt of court, theft of goods less than $500, illegal possession of stolen things.

CALIZZA SADE RUFFIN: 33, 13163 Varnado Road, Folsom, probation violation.

CHARLES JOHNSON: 20, 523 Coffin Ave., New Orleans, illegal possession of stolen things.

JUSTICE C. DAVENPORT: 23, 72425 Jasmine St., Covington, fugitive, resisting an officer.

ANTHONY BARNES: 26, 1200 Eagle Lake, Slidell, possession of Schedule II drug, possession of Schedule III drug, fugitive, parole violation.

DYLAN MATT CRADDOCK: 26, 308 East Dillmore, Chalmette, domestic abuse battery/ child endangerment.

CARDELL ALONZO: 38, 2006 Elysian Fields Ave., New Orleans, two counts of bank fraud, two counts of monetary instrument abuse.

Nov. 15

BRIONNE COMEAUX: 27, 104 Boswells Drive, Slidell, fugitive, parole violation.

RON JOSEPH TASTET: 45, 20471 Doris Road, Covington, resisting an officer, possession of Schedule I drug, taking contraband to and from a penal institution.

EMILE J. STEVENS: 60, 4800 Rhodes Drive, New Orleans, DWI first offense, improper parking on roadway, careless operation, driver must be licensed.

PAUL CHRISTOPHER GAULT: 25, 57 Blake Byrd Drive, Carriere, Miss., probation violation, failure to honor written promise to appear.

MALCOLM ALLAN BUTTS: 34, 12813 Mizell Loop, Bogalusa, housed for court, two counts theft under $1,000, illegal possession of stolen things less than $1,000,

BRIAN SCOTT KENNEDY: 49, 1637 U.S. 11 South, Picayune, Miss., probation violation.

TOM BICKHAM: 47, 57245 Square Road, Slidell, parole violation.

AMANDA LYN BORDELON: 27, 59274 Herwig Road, Slidell, probation violation.

LESHANTA L. RATLIFF: 24, 13923 CurrAn Road, New Orleans,  misdemeanor theft, bank fraud, money laundering, identify theft.

STEPHEN J. PREVOT: 42, 704 Sweet Olive Court, Slidell, felony theft.

VIRGINIA L. VICKNAIR: 59, 413 Heifner Run, Pearl River, operating a vehicle while intoxicated, careless operation.

CURTIS EDWARD HART: 26, 27271 Sol Hart Road, Franklinton, failure to honor written promise to appear.

CHASE ROBERT REVERE: 36, 4178 Evergreen Drive, Slidell, contempt of court.

TONY MAURICE SMITH: 31, 36270 Nicholas St., Slidell, second degree murder, failure to honor written promise to appear.

DILLON D. CANCIENNE: 21, 1501 Cherry Ridge Court, Mandeville, fugitive, two counts of contempt of court, two counts of surrender of defendant/bondsman off bond.

DANIELLE LYNN ODDO: 39, 100 Bosworth St., Slidell, two counts of contempt of court.

Nov. 16

BRANDON LEE OWENS: 24, 823 Stanley St., Slidell, probation violation.

BILLY J. RAINES: 25, 3300 Delaware Ave., Kenner, probation violation.

JOSE ARMAND BONILLA: 31, 20473 Ridgelake Road, Ponchatoula, probation violation.

CAMERON N. CHAUVIN: 27, 1200 Albert St., Mandeville, drug court sanction.

J. ZALDIVAR BONILLA: 19, 70496 A St., Covington, underage DWI, establishing speed zones, open container in motor vehicle.

RYAN C. FRANCOIS: 32, 6000 Chef Mentuer Hwy., New Orleans, operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated, reckless operation of a motor vehicle, driver must be licensed, no registration, no proof of insurance.

DEVIN PAUL LOCKHART: 27, 5018 Oaklane Road, Pineville, DWI first offense, possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabis, improper lane use, driving under suspension, possession of drug paraphernalia.

TONY LEROY WALKER: 59, 3601 Texas Drive, New Orleans, surrender of defendant/bondsman off bond.

HEATHER ABERCROMBIE: 31, 63537 La. 1090, Pearl River, domestic abuse battery, simple criminal damage to property,

DALTON PURCELL: 21, 308 North Timothy Drive, Columbia, Miss., resisting an officer.

SHELBY JOHN CASNAVE: 31, 21320 Willow Drive, Lacombe, resisting an officer, three counts of contempt of court.

DEVON PIERRE DUTEL: 30, 303 Katherine Ave., Covington, reckless operation of a motor vehicle, resisting a police officer with force or violence.

MICHAEL AARON MYERS: 25, 4476 Pontchartrain Drive, Slidell, aggravated assault.

CHRISTOPHER GUERRERO: 28, 26165 East Elm St., Lacombe, hit and run, driver must be licensed.

KERRY JAMES LEDOUX: 37, 743 North Lee Road, Covington, possession of Schedule II drug, possession of Schedule I drug.

ROBERT O. CRAMER: 67, 21086 Mire Drive, Abita Springs, stalking.

Nov. 17

CHRISTOPHER R. LEWIS: 27, 25682 West Elm, Lacombe, drug court sanction.

ANDREW R. HESTER: 24, 3504 Joyce Drive, Mandeville, operating vehicle while intoxicated, 2nd offense, careless operation, driving under suspension, expired vehicle inspection sticker, no mirror on driver’s side, fugitive.

JOHN W. HELTON: 28, 57573 La. 60, Bogalusa, operating a vehicle while intoxicated, failure to stop/yield, open container in motor vehicle, possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabis, possession of Schedule II drug.

BRIAN W. APPLEWHITE: 49, 4840 La. 22, Mandeville, operating vehicle while intoxicated, 2nd offense, careless operation.

SEYMON MARIE HOOKS: 35, 11006 South Hardy, New Orleans, fugitive.

CHRIS A. ROBERTSON: 20, 4513 Lynhuber Drive, New Orleans, possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabis.

ALICIA M. HANDLEY: 36, 57 Sam Powell Road, Picayune, Miss., possession of Schedule I drug, possession of Schedule II drug, possession of drug paraphernalia, expired license plate, driving under suspension, two counts of failure to honor written promise to appear.

CHRISTOPHER SAUCIER: 39, 3700 Pontchartrain Drive, Slidell, possession of Schedule II drug.

JODIE T. JOHNSON: 37, 312 East Silver Maple Drive, Slidell, possession of Schedule II drug.

CANDACE B. SMITH: 21, 110 Canulette Road, Slidell, possession of drug paraphernalia, contempt of court.

DARLENE ANN FOSTER: 53, 37493 East Hillcrest Drive, Slidell, entry on or remaining in places or on land after being forbidden.

KENON L. BROWN: 21, 704 Avenue H, Bogalusa, maximum speed limit, obstruction of justice, possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabis.

CHRIS A. HASTY: 27, 23348 Julia St., Abita Springs, failure to honor written promise to appear.

Nov. 18

WILLIAM DELATOUR: 20, 600 Bull Run Road, Schriever, possession of Schedule I drug.

DERRICK J. HENDERSON: 36, 1711 Kings Road, Slidell, domestic abuse battery, third offense, failure to honor written promise to appear.

ENTRE DIJON DILLON: 32, 325 2nd Ave., Bogalusa, illegal possession of stolen things, possession of a firearm by felon.

DWIGHT LORENZ WELLS: 52, 1153 Foxworth, Columbia, Miss., aggravated assault w/firearm.

TERRANCE A. LEWIS: 41, 1616 M.C. Moore, Hammond, four counts of possession with intent to distribute Schedule II drug, possession of Schedule II drug, two counts of possession with intent to distribute Schedule I drug: heroin, possession Schedule IV drug with intent to distribute

EUGENE THOMAS: 37, 104 South Duncan Ave., Amite, simple burglary, possession of Schedule I drug.

LEROY WHITE: 35, 2628 Jackson Ave., New Orleans, aggravated battery.

DANTE MICHAEL COOPER: 25, 520 Beechwood Drive, Slidell, unauthorized entry of an inhabited dwelling, aggravated flight from officer, purse snatching, second degree battery, aggravated assault with firearm, simple criminal damage to property, aggravated assault with firearm.

BRANDON R. ELLIS: 31, 204 Bridge Court, Franklinton, domestic abuse battery, aggravated battery.

ERNEST A. BRIGHT: 34, 1915 La Noire St., Franklinton, aggravated battery, possession with intent to distribute Schedule I drug, marijuana or synthetic cannabis substance, taking contraband to and from a penal institution.

AUBREY M. ALEXIUS: 53, 1780 Sullivan Drive, Slidell, domestic abuse battery.

ASIA NICOLE COLEMAN: 22, 180 Gouaux Ave., Houma, theft under $1,000, contributing to the delinquency.

PERRY ROBINSON: 29, 749 Camilla Ave., Laplace, fugitive.

ARROYNIA C. STEWARD: 29, 3207 Loraine Park St., Houston, Texas.

KAYLA DAWN CARVER: 30, 37165 Charles Anderson Road, Pearl River, contempt of court, two counts surrender of defendant/bondsman off bond.

HEATHER C. RUSHER: 45, 2300 Cypress Ave., Gulfport, Miss., telephone communications, improper language, harassment.

NICHOLAS M. MATTHEWS: 30, 133 Blackfin Cove, Slidell, domestic abuse battery/strangulation, surrender of defendant/bondsman off bond.

Nov. 19 

ZACHARY JIMENEZ: 20, 1923 Destin St., Mandeville, two counts possession of Schedule I drug.

DARREN JOSEPH KAIN: 26, 3700 Pontchartrain Drive, Slidell, housed for court.

MARCELENO CISNEROS: 51, 1734 10th St., Greenberg, 51, DWI first offense, careless operation, driver must be licensed, open container in motor vehicle, no proof of insurance, expired license plate.

DANIEL A. SALMINEN: 36, 23365 Delery St., Mandeville, DWI third offense, improper lane use, open container in motor vehicle, false motor vehicle inspection.

CHRISTOPHER WARREN: 24, 53124 La. 436, Angie, fugitive.

CHRISTINE M. NOLAN: 43, 3234 Bartlett Drive, Baton Rouge, three counts of bank fraud, three counts of forgery, two counts of identity theft.

DAVID G. FONTENOT: 26, 4606 Orleans Blvd., Metairie, two counts of failure to honor written promise to appear.

BARBARA M. LINDE: 67, 602 Albert St., Mandeville, domestic abuse battery.

RASHARD H. LAFRANCE: 28, 7213 Chatelain Drive, New Orleans, housed for court, contempt of court.

RON K. THOMPSON: 52, 25664 West Chestnut St., Lacombe, parole violation.

NEIL A. PARNELL: 67, 60207 La. 434, Lacombe, parole violation.

JEFFREY ALLEN DAVIS: 28, 124 Queens Drive West, Slidell, illegal distribution of Schedule II drug, possession of drug paraphernalia, illegal use of drug in presence of persons under, cruelty to juveniles.

HENRY J. LITTLE: 34, 55192 Old Uneedus Road, Loranger, possession of drug paraphernalia, simple burglary of an inhabited dwelling, possession of firearm or carrying concealed weapon.

CHEYENNE F. HURLBURT: 22, 236 Byrd St., Slidell, aggravated assault.

SAWYER N. ROBBINS: 19, 112 Yorkshire Drive, Slidell, contempt of court.

AMBER C. THOMPSON: 52, 25499 Folsom Drive, Abita Springs, simple burglary of an inhabited dwelling, theft under $1,000.

BRANDON D. CRAWFORD: 24, 37540 Browns Village Road, Slidell, domestic abuse battery/pregnant victim.

RANDY MCCOY WHITE: 40, 217 South Queens Drive, Slidell, possession of Schedule II drug.

Nov. 20

RANDY CHARLES ADAMS: 57, 2155 General Persian St., Mandeville, drug court sanction.

SHERMAN D. KIVIAHO: 57, 1750 Beth Drive, Slidell, DWI, second offense, careless operation, open container in motor vehicle.

JAY GREGORY QUINN: 33, 46519 Island Drive, Hammond, terrorizing.

RAYMOND J. BROWN: 42, 200 River Point Drive, Destrehan, domestic abuse battery/strangulation.

MIRANDA C. VASQUEZ: 33, 1004 Meridian Road, West Palm Beach, Fla., distribution or possession with intent to distribute Schedule I drug, fugitive.

JESSE A. GONZALES: 30, 1010 Southwest 24th St., San Antonio, Texas, improper lane use, distribution or possession with intent to distribute Schedule I drug.

RAINE MADISON DAVIS: 24, 37388 Murray Road, Pearl River, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession with intent to distribute Schedule II drug.

DANIEL W. SMITH: 46, 3075 Effie St., Slidell, two counts of distribution of Schedule I drug, illegal distribution of Schedule II drug, failure to honor written promise to appear, possession with intent to distribute Schedule I drug, possession with intent to distribute Schedule II drug, possession of Schedule II drug, transactions involving proceeds from drug offenses, possession of drug paraphernalia.

DERRECK O. NELSON: 18, 2123 Wellington Lane, Slidell, simple criminal damage to property $1,000 to under $50, possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabis.

JAMES A. SALVANT: 19, 118 Anna St., Slidell, illegal use of weapons, aggravated assault with firearm.

SYLVANUS G. ELLIS: 19, 70417 8th St., Covington, disturbing the peace by appearing in an intoxicated condition.

TRACY H. LOTZ: 44, 3075 Effie St., Slidell, distribution of Schedule I drug, possession with intent to distribute Schedule II drug, possession of Schedule II drug, transactions involving proceeds from drug offenses, possession of drug paraphernalia.

RYAN MICHAEL DOMINO: 31, 35578 Oak Ridge Ave., Slidell, domestic abuse battery/child endangerment.

ZACHARY E. HOLIFIELD: 35, 37226 Holifield Lane, Pearl River, illegal possession of stolen things $1,000 to less than, theft under $1,000.

ASHLEY MARIE SMITH: 34, 37226 Holifield Lane, Pearl River, theft between $1,000 and $5,000, theft under $1,000.

EDWARD JOSEPH AUBERT: 40, 62089 Raymond Road, Lacombe, contempt of court, possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabis, possession of drug paraphernalia.

SETH BENJAMIN BURNS: 19, 17216 St. Gertrude Road, Covington, fugitive.

ROBERT CHARLES WYNN: 25, 215 West Green Ave., Picayune, Miss., simple criminal damage to property,

BRANDON M. ROBERTSON: 32, 77 Marie Drive, Avondale, fugitive.

TERRANCE YOUNG: 39, 2509 Catana Lane, Harvey, housed for marshal.

DION GURLEY: 21, 7220 Queensway Drive, New Orleans, housed for marshal.

JERMAINE HULBERT: 40, 3716 Marais St., New Orleans, housed for marshal.

SIDNEY PATTERSON: 28, 2715 West Villere St., New Orleans, housed for marshal.

VANESSA N. TABORA: 35, 633 Lancer Lane, Kenner, probation violation, parole violation.

Nov. 21 

FREDDIE SLAUGHTER: 38, 307 Buckeye Lane, Covington, drug court sanction.

MIKEL P. SHELVIN: 24, 2615 North Causeway Blvd., Mandeville, drug court sanction.

RICKY G. LEBLANC: 56, 312 East Magee St., Covington, contempt of court.

LANE VINCENT LORE: 28, 329 Concord Drive, Mandeville, DWI, first offense, reckless operation of a motor vehicle.

ROSANNA M. MIRAZO: 54, 505 Wood Place, Everett, Washington, DWI, first offense, contempt of court.

CHRISTOPHER M. REED: 36, 175 Inspiration Lane, Covington, probation violation.

KRYSTAL D. MALANDERS: 49, 29284 Berry Todd Road, Lacombe, probation violation, contempt of court.

CHAD MICHAEL REEVES: 46, 37 Gibbs Drive, Chalmette, monetary instrument abuse.

MARY POPULIS: 50, 2101 2nd St., Slidell, possession of Schedule II drug, possession of drug paraphernalia, improper lane use.

CALVIN LEON POPULIS: 51, 121 Fifth St., Slidell, possession of Schedule II drug, possession of drug paraphernalia, obstruction of justice.

SCOTT SWEENEY: 53, 381 Moonraker Drive, Slidell, domestic abuse battery, failure to honor written promise to appear.

ROBERT L. STANDEFORD: 48, 56009 La. 433, Slidell, battery of a dating partner.

BRADLEY DAVID WHITE: 32, 329 Thames Drive, Slidell, possession of Schedule I drug, possession of drug paraphernalia, violation with a controlled substance within 2,000 feet of a school.

TROY JEROME CAROLLO: 31, 103 Covington Meadow Circle, Covington, theft under $1,000.

ANGELA REBECCA BROCK: 40, 62200 West End Blvd., Slidell, possession of Schedule II drug, possession of Schedule I drug, possession of drug paraphernalia.

ELLIS C. NICHOLS: 45, 62200 West End Blvd., Slidell, possession of Schedule II drug, possession of Schedule III drug, creation or operation of a clandestine lab for drug, sale distribution or possession of legend drug without prescription, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of Schedule IV drug.

QUENTIN ALEXANDER: 27, 1200 Eagle Lake Drive, Slidell, domestic abuse battery/child endangerment, possession of Schedule I,

KIMBERLY A. TREMBLAY: 33, 4390 Inniswood Road, Baton Rouge, housed for marshal.

MARVIN C. SIMS: 33, 9673 Irby St., New Orleans, housed for marshal.

Nov. 22

JAMI J. TRIMMER: 59, 612 Red Oak Drive, Mandeville, DWI first offense, careless operation.

GRANT C. BENNETT: 41, 1137 Pine St., Slidell, possession of Schedule III drug, possession of Schedule IV drug.

AMANDA L. JONES: 39, 650 Dale Drive, Slidell, no taillights, possession of Schedule III drug, possession of Schedule IV drug.

TALON DENZEL THOMAS: 21, 818 Lake Arthur Court, Slidell, battery on emergency personnel or health care professional, violation of protection order.

LAWRENCE GUY WILLIE: 49, 80229 North Willie Road, Folsom, contempt of court.

JASON A. KAUZLARICH: 45, 2220 Crane St., Slidell, registration of sex offenders, license plate must be illuminated, improper lane use.

STANLEY JOHN WILLIS: 58, 166 B Lakeview Drive, Slidell, drug court sanction.

DENNIS J. JOHNSON: 61, 15420 Gretchen Lane, Covington, DWI, second offense, careless operation.

SHANE DANIEL LEE: 37, 47108 Conrad Anderson, Hammond, housed for court.

CHRISTOPHER CHAPMAN: 41, 1109 Washington St., Bogalusa, housed for court.

EDMUND A. PREVOST: 25, 2020 Red Oak Lane, Mandeville, hit and run, following too close, driving under suspension, no safety belts, no inspection sticker, operating uninsured motor vehicle.

SCOTT ANTHONY PARDO: 47, 3078 South Palm Drive, Slidell, failure to honor written promise to appear, unauthorized use of motor vehicle, exploitation of the infirm, failure to return leased movable obtaining by false representation.

DEAN ANDREW PERKINS: 26, 70243 9th St., Covington, fugitive.

JAQUAN BROWN: 20, 2518 Stanton Lane, Slidell, housed for court.

PHILLIP HUNT MAYERS: 28, 11031 La. 22, St. Amant, housed for marshal.

LATWAINE D. CALDWELL: 45, 4790 Pontchartrain Drive, Slidell, possession of firearm or carrying concealed weapon, possession of Schedule II.

KENDALYN R. BARRIE: 17, 70229 5th St., Covington, armed robbery.

MILTON ALLEN BRIANT: 48, 61060 North 24th St., Lacombe, domestic abuse battery.

CHARLES MICHAEL BEAN: 35, 3370 Rivet Drive, Slidell, battery on emergency personnel or health care professional, disturbing the peace by appearing in an intoxicated condition.

ADONIS TYLER YOUNG: 28, 248 Goldenwood Drive, Slidell, second degree battery.

AALIYAH RICHARDSON: 17, 3731 Arrowhead Drive, Slidell, attempted second degree murder, illegal possession of stolen firearms.

Nov. 23

EDWARD R. WILLIAMS: 43, 1423 Eastridge Drive, Slidell, contempt of court, aggravated flight from officer, driving while under suspension for certain prior offenses, fugitive.

GREGORY J. BATISTE: 65, 18084 Napoleon Ave., Lacombe, contempt of court, possession of drug paraphernalia, resisting an officer.

KEVIN A. LEWIS: 38, 28125 Napoleon Road, Lacombe, possession of Schedule II drug, improper turn, ignore traffic signal.

JUSTIN C. O’NEAL: 34, 29059 Berry Todd Road, Lacombe, failure to honor written promise to appear, two headlights required, resisting an officer, possession of Schedule II, contempt of court.

DAVID J. DEMARCO: 35, 83 Magnolia Drive, Covington, drug court sanction.

BRANDON LEE OWENS: 24, 823 Stanley St., Slidell, parole violation.

WILLIAM B. GOODMAN: 22, 29004 La. 16, Sun, contempt of court.

SAMMIE MATTHEWS: 26, 2130 11th St., Slidell, carnal knowledge of a juvenile.

JOSHUA O’NEAL DIXON: 19, 20 Cross Creek Drive, Slidell, attempted second degree murder, possession of firearm or carrying concealed weapon.

LAUREN HARMON: 32, 12040 La. 1077, Folsom, failure to honor written promise to appear.

JORDANE GANAPAMO: 29, 160 Beech St., Covington, aggravated obstruction of highway or commerce.

JASON J. SMITH: 33, 36858 Wes O’Berry Road, Pearl River, DWI, 3rd offense, driving left of center.

CARLAHN E. MARTIN: 28, 124 Drury Lane, Slidell, domestic abuse battery/child endangerment.

CHRISTOPHER A. BURNS: 26, 416 Water Oak Lane, Mandeville, drug court sanction.

THOMAS EUGENE PATRICK: 29, 16091 Windsor Drive, Tickfaw, possession of Schedule I drug, switched plates, failure to register vehicle, driving under suspension.

JONATHAN G. SMITH: 56, 2601 Tulane Ave., fugitive.

CRISTIAN ZELAYA: 26, 22 Dickerson St., Picayune, Miss., DWI first offense, careless operation, battery of a police officer, resisting an officer, driver must be licensed.

Nov. 24

MORRIS JOSEPH BERRY: 39, 317 Portsmouth Drive, Slidell, two counts of contempt of court, possession of Schedule I drug.

STEVEN M. RODRIGUEZ: 42, 117 Fountain Dr., Slidell, distribution or possession with intent to distribute Schedule I drug, possession with intent to distribute Schedule II drug, illegal carrying of weapon during crime of violence, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabinoids, distribution/possession with intent to distribute Schedule III drug, possession of firearm or carrying concealed weapon.

FRANKIE A. JAMES: 37, 1385 Dunson Road, Hammond, resisting an officer, possession of Schedule II, failure to honor written promise to appear, contempt of court.

TRENTON WAYNE ROY: 29, 833 Michigan Ave., Slidell, domestic abuse battery/strangulation.

SHEA M. GUYTON: 22, 71 Birdie Drive, Slidell, theft between $1,000 and $5,000.

JAMES BOYD: 29, 2702 Ms. 569 South, Liberty, Mississippi, DWI, second offense, maximum speed limit.

MARSEL A. BREWER: 34, 401 South Pecan St., Bogalusa, careless operation, illegal possession of stolen firearms.

BILLY JOE RAINES: 25, 3300 Delaware Ave., Kenner, probation violation.

BRAD WAYNE LEMOINE: 45, 69292 4th Ave., Covington, cyberstalking, attempted.

CHRISTY L. STEINER: 45, 183 McDonnell Ave., Biloxi, Miss., possession with intent to distribute Schedule II drug, illegal carrying of weapon during crime of violence or, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana or synthetic cannabis, distribution/possession with intent to distribute Schedule III drug, possession of firearm or carrying concealed weapon, distribution/possession of legend drug without a prescription.

JAMES DAVID REIS: 50, 28402 Rose Oak St., Ponchatoula, DWI, first offense, careless operation.

JAMIE QUINT KLIBERT: 57, 82450 Anthony Road, Folsom, failure to honor written promise to appear, contempt of court.

ARACELI PORTILLO: 21, 36 Barbio Road, Covington, theft under $1,000.

MIRANDA PORTILLO: 19, 36 Barbio Road, Covington, theft under $1,000.

CHRISTOPHER R. LEWIS: 27, 25682 West Elm, Lacombe, drug court sanction.

ANTONIO CAMPOS-VASQUEZ: 44, 133 Neptune Road, Slidell, aggravated assault, aggravated battery, criminal damage to property $1,000 to under $50.

Forty-six people were housed for immigration violations during this time period.

 

Ohio LSU signs…

Nov 29, 2019 in News
Source: WBRZ

BATON ROUGE- The LSU Tigers, led by Joe Burrow, make their final home stand of the season on Saturday.

All eyes will be on the Heisman hopeful. And Travis Brand, owner of Gigi’s Country Kitchen, is one of the eager fans who’ll be watching.

Brand used to make omelets for Burrow in his Ohio hometown. He traveled to Baton Rouge to see how the young man he knew has grown into a leader and inspiration.

It was a shot in the dark when a group of LSU fans saw some of those signs that are outside of Gigi’s and decided they wanted to bring the owner down to Tiger Stadium to see Burrow in action himself. But after a few calls, they made it happen.

“He inspires our entire town. His hard work, dedication. It’s been pretty incredible,” Brand said.

Brand has seen Burrow’s success grow from his time at Athens high school when he would stop in at Gigi’s.

“Joe always gets the Joe Burrow, which was formally the western omelet,” Brand said.

Now leading the Tiger’s in their so far undefeated season, Brand proudly wears the purple and gold colors in Buckeye territory.

“I mean you go into Athens, Ohio, they bleed scarlet and gray in Athens. I mean we’re an hour south of Ohio State. But it’s purple and gold nation up here. We’re all tigers fans,” Brand said.

Brand displays his support, loud and proud, on his restaurant sign out front on North Plains Road, and he says the entire town has turned team Burrow.

“Why wouldn’t you? I mean that’s our hometown hero,” Brand said.

Brand says his hometown’s depth is proven by the fact that their support for Burrow extends as far as 1,000 miles.

“I don’t care if you come out of this town and you become the world’s greatest shuffleboard player. We’re going to support you. I mean to see somebody come out of a small town like ours and bring some positive light to the area, the community, bring some hope,” Brand said.

With a chance to bring another Heisman trophy back to Baton Rouge, and in extension, to The Plains, everyone in both towns is on the same page.

“It’s incredible, there are not too many other words to describe it. Whether you’re a football fan or not, you’re going to get behind the fella. Everybody’s pulling for him,” Brand said.

Brand said that he’s never been to a college football tailgate. Of course, that’s all changing Saturday as his newfound Louisiana friends show him the best place to tailgate in the country.

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Child Support FAQ’s

LouisianaLawHelp.org

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Frequently Asked Questions about Child Support in Louisiana

Authored By: Louisiana Family Law Task Force

FAQ

What is child support?

This is money to help the other parent raise the child(ren) and to pay for everyday living expenses for them.

Who can get child support?

A married, unmarried, or divorced parent, who has physical custody of a child, can get child support. This is a parent, who takes care of a child, called the primary caretaker or domiciliary parent. As long as a parent is the biological father of the child, you can get child support from him.

Nonparents such as grandparents may get child support from the biological parents if they have legal custody of a child.

How do I get child support?

1. You may get child support if the other parentagrees to pay you money to help raise a child.

2. You may also get child support from that parent by filing papers with the court. These papers are called a Rule for Child Support or Petition for Divorce. You may use Child Support Enforcement Services to help you. You work with the caseworker, who will work with the District Attorney’s Office for you. The district attorney will file court papers to help you get child support from the other parent. You may also hire a private attorney or use a legal services attorney if you are qualified for their free service.

Usually, if you have questions about child support, the first and best place to start is to call the Child Support Enforcement Services office in your area. You may have to pay a fee from $10.00 to $25.00 to get their help.

Click here for information about your local Child Support Enforcement Office

When should I try to get child support?

When you need the money to raise a child, and when you are separated or live apart from the other parent.

What court do I use, to get child support started?

You may file a petition for divorce requesting child support in a state district court, or you can file a rule for child support in state district or juvenile court. You file papers for child support in the parish where you and your child live, where the father of the child lives, where the child was conceived or born, or where the father acknowledged that he is the father of the child.

The parent of my child avoided getting the court papers and is hiding from the sheriff.  Can I still get child support?

Yes, you can. It may just take a longer time for you to get child support. If Child Support Enforcement Services is helping you, the state will try to get the court papers to them so that they know about the hearing date. The state will try to find the absent parent by using their social security number. But as a last resort, the court may appoint a curator ad hoc (someone to represent the absent parent). The curator ad hoc will be served with the court papers and will represent the absent parent at the child support hearing. The curator ad hoc will try to let absent parent know that there is a child support hearing coming up. Once that is done by the curator, your attorney or the state’s attorney will be able to ask the court to order child support.

How much child support can I get?

It depends on

  • the number of children you have with the other parent,
  • your income,
  • the other parent’s income, and
  • the kind of custody you have of the child (shared or not).

Child support in Louisiana is based on the need of the child or children and the ability of the other parent to pay child support. (That is, the child support amount will be based on how much you make and how much the other parent makes).

Here are some examples. (1) If you have one child living with you (you have custody), you make $893.00 a month, and the other parent makes $1,000.00 a month. Your child support amount will be $171.09 based on the child support guidelines. (2) You have what is called “shared custody,” (the child lives with you and the other parent gets to see the child almost half of the time of the year). You make $500.00 and the other parent makes $1,000.00 a month. Then the other parent will owe you $13.73 dollars a month instead of $171.09 a month.

How do I get the amount of child support changed?

You may get the amount of child support changed if there is a material change of circumstances (this is when the custody arrangement is changed, yours or the other parent’s income has changed, or there have been other big changes in your family life). For example:

  • Instead of having shared custody, the other parent sees the child much less than 50% of the time in a year and the child lives with you more now. You may get the child support order changed to get more money.
  • The child’s needs have increased (for example, you may need more money as the child gets older).
  • The other parent makes more money and it has been more than three years since you were in court to get child support.
What if the other parent is not working and does not have any income, can I still get child support?

Yes, because the law requires a non-custodial parent (that is, a parent who does not live with the child) pay a minimum amount of child support. That minimum amount is $100.00 a month for any number of children. But if your custody arrangement is shared or split custody, then there is no requirement. The law also requires that at least minimum wage be counted as the other parent’s income.

Can I get child support from the other parent if he or she is disabled or cannot work and is receiving SSI, or SSDI?

No, you will not be able to receive child support if the other parent is receiving SSI, and can prove that he cannot work. But you may be able to receive child support if the other parent is receiving SSDI (disability insurance).

What if the father of my child claims not to be the biological father?

You need to prove he is the father by asking the court to order or require him to take a DNA test. If you have help from the Child Support Enforcement Services, the state will order the test . The father will pay for the test if he is found to be the father. If he is found not to be the father of your child, then he does not have to pay for the testing or the child support.

Do I have to go to court to get a custody order before I can get the child support order?

No. At your child support hearing, you will be asked where the child lives and who is living with the child, and many other questions about your and the other parent’s income.

The father or mother of my child has not paid child support since they were ordered to do so. What do I do?

If you got the child support order with the help of Child Support Enforcement Services, speak to your caseworker. The caseworker will contact the parent and try to work something out with them. Or, the caseworker – through the District Attorney’s Office – will go to court and file a Rule for Contempt. The other parent will be called back into court for a contempt hearing and can be put in jail for not paying child support since the last court date. Privately paid attorneys may also do this and get attorney’s fees.

My child’s mother/father is not paying child support.  I live in a different parish now.  Do I have to go back to the court which gave me the child support order to try to get him or her to pay now?

Maybe. You don’t have to go back to the other court if you register the child support order with the court in the parish where you are living in now. You register by filing the child support order with the court in the parish where you are living now. This is like filing with the court to start child support again. You need to serve the father or mother with court papers: either by certified registered mail or by having the sheriff’s office serve the papers.

But if you don’t want to register the order with the new court, you have to go back to the first court.

Now the parent of my child does not work and does not have any money.  How do I get them to pay for child support?

You take the other parent back to court by filing papers with the court with the help of Child Support Enforcement Services or an attorney. The court will order the other parent to pay child support based on the minimum wage or based on their past earning capacity or potential earning capacity (that is, what he or she used to earn, or is capable of earning).

However, a custodial parent of a child born of both parents under the age of 5 is not required to work, and a judge cannot make a parent of a child younger than five pay child support.

I have a child support hearing scheduled with Child Support Enforcement Services and the District Attorney’s Office. But I also have a custody hearing a few weeks after that. Should I wait for the custody hearing?

Child support is separate from custody and visitation. You should go to the child support hearing, and custody will be decided later. If there are any changes, then the parent who has to pay child support has to go back to court and get the child support amount changed.

Last Review and Update: May 17, 2007

PRINT FRIENDLY

Frequently Asked Questions about Child Support in Louisiana

Authored By: Louisiana Family Law Task Force

FAQ

What is child support?

This is money to help the other parent raise the child(ren) and to pay for everyday living expenses for them.

Who can get child support?

A married, unmarried, or divorced parent, who has physical custody of a child, can get child support. This is a parent, who takes care of a child, called the primary caretaker or domiciliary parent. As long as a parent is the biological father of the child, you can get child support from him.

Nonparents such as grandparents may get child support from the biological parents if they have legal custody of a child.

How do I get child support?

1. You may get child support if the other parentagrees to pay you money to help raise a child.

2. You may also get child support from that parent by filing papers with the court. These papers are called a Rule for Child Support or Petition for Divorce. You may use Child Support Enforcement Services to help you. You work with the caseworker, who will work with the District Attorney’s Office for you. The district attorney will file court papers to help you get child support from the other parent. You may also hire a private attorney or use a legal services attorney if you are qualified for their free service.

Usually, if you have questions about child support, the first and best place to start is to call the Child Support Enforcement Services office in your area. You may have to pay a fee from $10.00 to $25.00 to get their help.

Click here for information about your local Child Support Enforcement Office

When should I try to get child support?

When you need the money to raise a child, and when you are separated or live apart from the other parent.

What court do I use, to get child support started?

You may file a petition for divorce requesting child support in a state district court, or you can file a rule for child support in state district or juvenile court. You file papers for child support in the parish where you and your child live, where the father of the child lives, where the child was conceived or born, or where the father acknowledged that he is the father of the child.

The parent of my child avoided getting the court papers and is hiding from the sheriff.  Can I still get child support?

Yes, you can. It may just take a longer time for you to get child support. If Child Support Enforcement Services is helping you, the state will try to get the court papers to them so that they know about the hearing date. The state will try to find the absent parent by using their social security number. But as a last resort, the court may appoint a curator ad hoc (someone to represent the absent parent). The curator ad hoc will be served with the court papers and will represent the absent parent at the child support hearing. The curator ad hoc will try to let absent parent know that there is a child support hearing coming up. Once that is done by the curator, your attorney or the state’s attorney will be able to ask the court to order child support.

How much child support can I get?

It depends on

  • the number of children you have with the other parent,
  • your income,
  • the other parent’s income, and
  • the kind of custody you have of the child (shared or not).

Child support in Louisiana is based on the need of the child or children and the ability of the other parent to pay child support. (That is, the child support amount will be based on how much you make and how much the other parent makes).

Here are some examples. (1) If you have one child living with you (you have custody), you make $893.00 a month, and the other parent makes $1,000.00 a month. Your child support amount will be $171.09 based on the child support guidelines. (2) You have what is called “shared custody,” (the child lives with you and the other parent gets to see the child almost half of the time of the year). You make $500.00 and the other parent makes $1,000.00 a month. Then the other parent will owe you $13.73 dollars a month instead of $171.09 a month.

How do I get the amount of child support changed?

You may get the amount of child support changed if there is a material change of circumstances (this is when the custody arrangement is changed, yours or the other parent’s income has changed, or there have been other big changes in your family life). For example:

  • Instead of having shared custody, the other parent sees the child much less than 50% of the time in a year and the child lives with you more now. You may get the child support order changed to get more money.
  • The child’s needs have increased (for example, you may need more money as the child gets older).
  • The other parent makes more money and it has been more than three years since you were in court to get child support.
What if the other parent is not working and does not have any income, can I still get child support?

Yes, because the law requires a non-custodial parent (that is, a parent who does not live with the child) pay a minimum amount of child support. That minimum amount is $100.00 a month for any number of children. But if your custody arrangement is shared or split custody, then there is no requirement. The law also requires that at least minimum wage be counted as the other parent’s income.

Can I get child support from the other parent if he or she is disabled or cannot work and is receiving SSI, or SSDI?

No, you will not be able to receive child support if the other parent is receiving SSI, and can prove that he cannot work. But you may be able to receive child support if the other parent is receiving SSDI (disability insurance).

What if the father of my child claims not to be the biological father?

You need to prove he is the father by asking the court to order or require him to take a DNA test. If you have help from the Child Support Enforcement Services, the state will order the test . The father will pay for the test if he is found to be the father. If he is found not to be the father of your child, then he does not have to pay for the testing or the child support.

Do I have to go to court to get a custody order before I can get the child support order?

No. At your child support hearing, you will be asked where the child lives and who is living with the child, and many other questions about your and the other parent’s income.

The father or mother of my child has not paid child support since they were ordered to do so. What do I do?

If you got the child support order with the help of Child Support Enforcement Services, speak to your caseworker. The caseworker will contact the parent and try to work something out with them. Or, the caseworker – through the District Attorney’s Office – will go to court and file a Rule for Contempt. The other parent will be called back into court for a contempt hearing and can be put in jail for not paying child support since the last court date. Privately paid attorneys may also do this and get attorney’s fees.

My child’s mother/father is not paying child support.  I live in a different parish now.  Do I have to go back to the court which gave me the child support order to try to get him or her to pay now?

Maybe. You don’t have to go back to the other court if you register the child support order with the court in the parish where you are living in now. You register by filing the child support order with the court in the parish where you are living now. This is like filing with the court to start child support again. You need to serve the father or mother with court papers: either by certified registered mail or by having the sheriff’s office serve the papers.

But if you don’t want to register the order with the new court, you have to go back to the first court.

Now the parent of my child does not work and does not have any money.  How do I get them to pay for child support?

You take the other parent back to court by filing papers with the court with the help of Child Support Enforcement Services or an attorney. The court will order the other parent to pay child support based on the minimum wage or based on their past earning capacity or potential earning capacity (that is, what he or she used to earn, or is capable of earning).

However, a custodial parent of a child born of both parents under the age of 5 is not required to work, and a judge cannot make a parent of a child younger than five pay child support.

I have a child support hearing scheduled with Child Support Enforcement Services and the District Attorney’s Office. But I also have a custody hearing a few weeks after that. Should I wait for the custody hearing?

Child support is separate from custody and visitation. You should go to the child support hearing, and custody will be decided later. If there are any changes, then the parent who has to pay child support has to go back to court and get the child support amount changed.

Last Review and Update: May 17, 2007
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Page Content Site Navigation Footer LHEnglish Spanish All Languages Hide Visit Legal Topics Find a Lawyer GO Advanced Search SHARE EMAIL PRINT FRIENDLY Frequently Asked Questions about Child Support in Louisiana Authored By: Louisiana Family Law Task Force FAQ What is child support? This is money to help the other parent raise the child(ren) and to pay for everyday living expenses for them. Who can get child support? A married, unmarried, or divorced parent, who has physical custody of a child, can get child support. This is a parent, who takes care of a child, called the primary caretaker or domiciliary parent. As long as a parent is the biological father of the child, you can get child support from him. Nonparents such as grandparents may get child support from the biological parents if they have legal custody of a child. How do I get child support? 1. You may get child support if the other parentagrees to pay you money to help raise a child. 2. You may also get child support from that parent by filing papers with the court. These papers are called a Rule for Child Support or Petition for Divorce. You may use Child Support Enforcement Services to help you. You work with the caseworker, who will work with the District Attorney’s Office for you. The district attorney will file court papers to help you get child support from the other parent. You may also hire a private attorney or use a legal services attorney if you are qualified for their free service. Usually, if you have questions about child support, the first and best place to start is to call the Child Support Enforcement Services office in your area. You may have to pay a fee from $10.00 to $25.00 to get their help. Click here for information about your local Child Support Enforcement Office When should I try to get child support? When you need the money to raise a child, and when you are separated or live apart from the other parent. What court do I use, to get child support started? You may file a petition for divorce requesting child support in a state district court, or you can file a rule for child support in state district or juvenile court. You file papers for child support in the parish where you and your child live, where the father of the child lives, where the child was conceived or born, or where the father acknowledged that he is the father of the child. The parent of my child avoided getting the court papers and is hiding from the sheriff.  Can I still get child support? Yes, you can. It may just take a longer time for you to get child support. If Child Support Enforcement Services is helping you, the state will try to get the court papers to them so that they know about the hearing date. The state will try to find the absent parent by using their social security number. But as a last resort, the court may appoint a curator ad hoc (someone to represent the absent parent). The curator ad hoc will be served with the court papers and will represent the absent parent at the child support hearing. The curator ad hoc will try to let absent parent know that there is a child support hearing coming up. Once that is done by the curator, your attorney or the state’s attorney will be able to ask the court to order child support. How much child support can I get? It depends on the number of children you have with the other parent, your income, the other parent’s income, and the kind of custody you have of the child (shared or not). Child support in Louisiana is based on the need of the child or children and the ability of the other parent to pay child support. (That is, the child support amount will be based on how much you make and how much the other parent makes). Here are some examples. (1) If you have one child living with you (you have custody), you make $893.00 a month, and the other parent makes $1,000.00 a month. Your child support amount will be $171.09 based on the child support guidelines. (2) You have what is called “shared custody,” (the child lives with you and the other parent gets to see the child almost half of the time of the year). You make $500.00 and the other parent makes $1,000.00 a month. Then the other parent will owe you $13.73 dollars a month instead of $171.09 a month. How do I get the amount of child support changed? You may get the amount of child support changed if there is a material change of circumstances (this is when the custody arrangement is changed, yours or the other parent’s income has changed, or there have been other big changes in your family life). For example: Instead of having shared custody, the other parent sees the child much less than 50% of the time in a year and the child lives with you more now. You may get the child support order changed to get more money. The child’s needs have increased (for example, you may need more money as the child gets older). The other parent makes more money and it has been more than three years since you were in court to get child support. What if the other parent is not working and does not have any income, can I still get child support? Yes, because the law requires a non-custodial parent (that is, a parent who does not live with the child) pay a minimum amount of child support. That minimum amount is $100.00 a month for any number of children. But if your custody arrangement is shared or split custody, then there is no requirement. The law also requires that at least minimum wage be counted as the other parent’s income. Can I get child support from the other parent if he or she is disabled or cannot work and is receiving SSI, or SSDI? No, you will not be able to receive child support if the other parent is receiving SSI, and can prove that he cannot work. But you may be able to receive child support if the other parent is receiving SSDI (disability insurance). What if the father of my child claims not to be the biological father? You need to prove he is the father by asking the court to order or require him to take a DNA test. If you have help from the Child Support Enforcement Services, the state will order the test . The father will pay for the test if he is found to be the father. If he is found not to be the father of your child, then he does not have to pay for the testing or the child support. Do I have to go to court to get a custody order before I can get the child support order? No. At your child support hearing, you will be asked where the child lives and who is living with the child, and many other questions about your and the other parent’s income. The father or mother of my child has not paid child support since they were ordered to do so. What do I do? If you got the child support order with the help of Child Support Enforcement Services, speak to your caseworker. The caseworker will contact the parent and try to work something out with them. Or, the caseworker – through the District Attorney’s Office – will go to court and file a Rule for Contempt. The other parent will be called back into court for a contempt hearing and can be put in jail for not paying child support since the last court date. Privately paid attorneys may also do this and get attorney’s fees. My child’s mother/father is not paying child support.  I live in a different parish now.  Do I have to go back to the court which gave me the child support order to try to get him or her to pay now? Maybe. You don’t have to go back to the other court if you register the child support order with the court in the parish where you are living in now. You register by filing the child support order with the court in the parish where you are living now. This is like filing with the court to start child support again. You need to serve the father or mother with court papers: either by certified registered mail or by having the sheriff’s office serve the papers. But if you don’t want to register the order with the new court, you have to go back to the first court. Now the parent of my child does not work and does not have any money.  How do I get them to pay for child support? You take the other parent back to court by filing papers with the court with the help of Child Support Enforcement Services or an attorney. The court will order the other parent to pay child support based on the minimum wage or based on their past earning capacity or potential earning capacity (that is, what he or she used to earn, or is capable of earning). However, a custodial parent of a child born of both parents under the age of 5 is not required to work, and a judge cannot make a parent of a child younger than five pay child support. I have a child support hearing scheduled with Child Support Enforcement Services and the District Attorney’s Office. But I also have a custody hearing a few weeks after that. Should I wait for the custody hearing? Child support is separate from custody and visitation. You should go to the child support hearing, and custody will be decided later. If there are any changes, then the parent who has to pay child support has to go back to court and get the child support amount changed. Last Review and Update: May 17, 2007 Legal Topics Apply Online for Free Legal Help Self-Help Tools Family Work Housing Voting, Consitutional and Civil Rights Public Benefits Money, Debt, ID Theft Disasters Wills & Life Planning Seniors Disability Health Legal System Taxes Youth Rights Schools Art & Culture Find a Lawyer Search by program name Louisiana About Us Feedback Get Help! LawHelp with Sound Survey Using this site Site Tools Accessibility Contact Us Disclaimer Privacy powered by probono.net © 2001 – 2019, Pro Bono Net, All Rights Reserved. Legal Help in Other States Set your location Page Content Site Navigation Footer LHEnglish Spanish All Languages Hide Visit Legal Topics Find a Lawyer GO Advanced Search SHARE EMAIL PRINT FRIENDLY Frequently Asked Questions about Child Support in Louisiana Authored By: Louisiana Family Law Task Force FAQ What is child support? This is money to help the other parent raise the child(ren) and to pay for everyday living expenses for them. Who can get child support? A married, unmarried, or divorced parent, who has physical custody of a child, can get child support. This is a parent, who takes care of a child, called the primary caretaker or domiciliary parent. As long as a parent is the biological father of the child, you can get child support from him. Nonparents such as grandparents may get child support from the biological parents if they have legal custody of a child. How do I get child support? 1. You may get child support if the other parentagrees to pay you money to help raise a child. 2. You may also get child support from that parent by filing papers with the court. These papers are called a Rule for Child Support or Petition for Divorce. You may use Child Support Enforcement Services to help you. You work with the caseworker, who will work with the District Attorney’s Office for you. The district attorney will file court papers to help you get child support from the other parent. You may also hire a private attorney or use a legal services attorney if you are qualified for their free service. Usually, if you have questions about child support, the first and best place to start is to call the Child Support Enforcement Services office in your area. You may have to pay a fee from $10.00 to $25.00 to get their help. Click here for information about your local Child Support Enforcement Office When should I try to get child support? When you need the money to raise a child, and when you are separated or live apart from the other parent. What court do I use, to get child support started? You may file a petition for divorce requesting child support in a state district court, or you can file a rule for child support in state district or juvenile court. You file papers for child support in the parish where you and your child live, where the father of the child lives, where the child was conceived or born, or where the father acknowledged that he is the father of the child. The parent of my child avoided getting the court papers and is hiding from the sheriff.  Can I still get child support? Yes, you can. It may just take a longer time for you to get child support. If Child Support Enforcement Services is helping you, the state will try to get the court papers to them so that they know about the hearing date. The state will try to find the absent parent by using their social security number. But as a last resort, the court may appoint a curator ad hoc (someone to represent the absent parent). The curator ad hoc will be served with the court papers and will represent the absent parent at the child support hearing. The curator ad hoc will try to let absent parent know that there is a child support hearing coming up. Once that is done by the curator, your attorney or the state’s attorney will be able to ask the court to order child support. How much child support can I get? It depends on the number of children you have with the other parent, your income, the other parent’s income, and the kind of custody you have of the child (shared or not). Child support in Louisiana is based on the need of the child or children and the ability of the other parent to pay child support. (That is, the child support amount will be based on how much you make and how much the other parent makes). Here are some examples. (1) If you have one child living with you (you have custody), you make $893.00 a month, and the other parent makes $1,000.00 a month. Your child support amount will be $171.09 based on the child support guidelines. (2) You have what is called “shared custody,” (the child lives with you and the other parent gets to see the child almost half of the time of the year). You make $500.00 and the other parent makes $1,000.00 a month. Then the other parent will owe you $13.73 dollars a month instead of $171.09 a month. How do I get the amount of child support changed? You may get the amount of child support changed if there is a material change of circumstances (this is when the custody arrangement is changed, yours or the other parent’s income has changed, or there have been other big changes in your family life). For example: Instead of having shared custody, the other parent sees the child much less than 50% of the time in a year and the child lives with you more now. You may get the child support order changed to get more money. The child’s needs have increased (for example, you may need more money as the child gets older). The other parent makes more money and it has been more than three years since you were in court to get child support. What if the other parent is not working and does not have any income, can I still get child support? Yes, because the law requires a non-custodial parent (that is, a parent who does not live with the child) pay a minimum amount of child support. That minimum amount is $100.00 a month for any number of children. But if your custody arrangement is shared or split custody, then there is no requirement. The law also requires that at least minimum wage be counted as the other parent’s income. Can I get child support from the other parent if he or she is disabled or cannot work and is receiving SSI, or SSDI? No, you will not be able to receive child support if the other parent is receiving SSI, and can prove that he cannot work. But you may be able to receive child support if the other parent is receiving SSDI (disability insurance). What if the father of my child claims not to be the biological father? You need to prove he is the father by asking the court to order or require him to take a DNA test. If you have help from the Child Support Enforcement Services, the state will order the test . The father will pay for the test if he is found to be the father. If he is found not to be the father of your child, then he does not have to pay for the testing or the child support. Do I have to go to court to get a custody order before I can get the child support order? No. At your child support hearing, you will be asked where the child lives and who is living with the child, and many other questions about your and the other parent’s income. The father or mother of my child has not paid child support since they were ordered to do so. What do I do? If you got the child support order with the help of Child Support Enforcement Services, speak to your caseworker. The caseworker will contact the parent and try to work something out with them. Or, the caseworker – through the District Attorney’s Office – will go to court and file a Rule for Contempt. The other parent will be called back into court for a contempt hearing and can be put in jail for not paying child support since the last court date. Privately paid attorneys may also do this and get attorney’s fees. My child’s mother/father is not paying child support.  I live in a different parish now.  Do I have to go back to the court which gave me the child support order to try to get him or her to pay now? Maybe. You don’t have to go back to the other court if you register the child support order with the court in the parish where you are living in now. You register by filing the child support order with the court in the parish where you are living now. This is like filing with the court to start child support again. You need to serve the father or mother with court papers: either by certified registered mail or by having the sheriff’s office serve the papers. But if you don’t want to register the order with the new court, you have to go back to the first court. Now the parent of my child does not work and does not have any money.  How do I get them to pay for child support? You take the other parent back to court by filing papers with the court with the help of Child Support Enforcement Services or an attorney. The court will order the other parent to pay child support based on the minimum wage or based on their past earning capacity or potential earning capacity (that is, what he or she used to earn, or is capable of earning). However, a custodial parent of a child born of both parents under the age of 5 is not required to work, and a judge cannot make a parent of a child younger than five pay child support. I have a child support hearing scheduled with Child Support Enforcement Services and the District Attorney’s Office. But I also have a custody hearing a few weeks after that. Should I wait for the custody hearing? Child support is separate from custody and visitation. You should go to the child support hearing, and custody will be decided later. If there are any changes, then the parent who has to pay child support has to go back to court and get the child support amount changed. Last Review and Update: May 17, 2007 Legal Topics Apply Online for Free Legal Help Self-Help Tools Family Work Housing Voting, Consitutional and Civil Rights Public Benefits Money, Debt, ID Theft Disasters Wills & Life Planning Seniors Disability Health Legal System Taxes Youth Rights Schools Art & Culture Find a Lawyer Search by program name Louisiana About Us Feedback Get Help! LawHelp with Sound Survey Using this site Site Tools Accessibility Contact Us Disclaimer Privacy powered by probono.net © 2001 – 2019, Pro Bono Net, All Rights Reserved. Legal Help in Other States Set your location ShareThis Copy and Paste

Mandeville woman attempts to kill attorney…

Mandeville woman gets 22 years in prison for trying to kill her former attorney
WGNO Web Desk
19 hours ago
COVINGTON, LA – Back in 2016, 78-year-old Patricia M. Currie, of Mandeville, waited outside the office of her former attorney, with the intention of killing him. And on Thursday, Currie was sentenced to 22 years in prison for attempted second degree murder.
The attorney, who had represented Currie in a bankruptcy case, was alone in a back office at his law firm on Oct. 27, 2016, when he walked into the lobby area and discovered Currie sitting in a chair with latex gloves covering her hands, plastic grocery bags on her feet, and a white towel across her lap.

Currie didn’t have an appointment and announced that she had come to kill him. She then moved the towel, revealing a shotgun in her lap. She raised her gun at him, but he was able to wrestle the weapon from her and call police.

When St. Tammany Parish Sheriff’s deputies arrived and arrested Currie on the scene, they discovered the gun was loaded and that she had four additional shotgun shells in her undergarments, as well as a box of ammunition in her car.

The jury rejected Currie’s claims that she intended only to scare her former attorney.

At the contested sentencing hearing Thursday, Assistant District Attorneys Blair Alford and Angad S. Ghai, who prosecuted the case, argued for a sentence of 50 years, the maximum allowed by state law, while Currie’s attorneys asked for the minimum of 10 years.
The victim gave an emotional statement, recalling the terrifying events of that day and how he could think only of his wife and children as he fought for his life.

His wife also explained through tears how the crime continues to haunt the family, with the couple’s children living in fear that their father could be killed every day just going to work. Three other witnesses also testified about disturbing interactions they experienced with Currie.

To support their push for the maximum sentence, prosecutors noted the calculated nature and severity of the crime, Currie’s own statements and testimony during trial, and letters she wrote, stating that she understands why people “like blowing up buildings and opening fire on anybody & everybody.” She added in the letter, “That’s the way I feel.”

In announcing the 22-year sentence, the violent nature of crime was considered, as well as the fact that Currie used a firearm/dangerous weapon to facilitate the crime, her lack of truthfulness and candor with the court, her lack of remorse throughout the case and her apparent lack of remorse even during the sentencing hearing. He said those considerations were mitigated by the fact that she had no prior convictions.

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Mandeville storm worse than expected…

Mandeville: Storm worse than expected

Mandeville did not expect the storm to hit as hard as it did early Saturday morning, the mayor said.

NEW ORLEANS — More than 40,000 homes in west St. Tammany Parish were without power Saturday, Mandeville Mayor Donald Villere said in an official social media post by the city.

Officials did not expect the storm to hit as hard as it did in Mandeville, the mayor said.

Cleco is working on restoring power and has called in additional contractors to help with the recovery. The company didn’t have enough contractors staged for recovery because they didn’t expect this much damage, so it might take some time before power is restored, Villere said.

Washington St. Tammany Electric added a new photo.
Washington St. Tammany Electric added a new photo.

Winds blew trees into at least four homes in Mandeville, and trees have been blown down on Monroe and Coffee Streets. Also, Lakeshore Drive is flooded, Villere said.

“Please do not drive in the affected areas,” Villere said. “It is best if you stay off the street. Our police are out in force working to clear streets and direct traffic.”

Mandeville officials are working to bring power back to homes as quickly as possible

If you have a utility emergency in Mandeville, call the Mandeville Police Department at 985.626.9711, for medical emergencies call 911.

RELATED: Power out again at New Orleans International Airport

RELATED: 70,000 still without power, flights delayed after Olga rushes through

RELATED: LIST: Closings across Southeast Louisiana due to heavy rain

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Orleans Parish Notarial Archives Tour

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Don’t Miss the Orleans Parish Notarial Archives Tour!

October 17, 2019

Don’t Miss the Orleans Parish Notarial Archives Tour!

The Louisiana Notary Association invites you to join us in celebration of National Notary Public Day on November 7, 2019 with a tour of the New Orleans Notarial Archives!

Take a journey through Louisiana notarial history with an informative tour of notarial records dating back to 1735. This is a great opportunity to see the evolution of the Civil Law notary from pre-Louisiana Purchase through present day.

Where: New Orleans Notarial Archives

             1340 Poydras St

             New Orleans, LA 70112

When: Thursday, November 7, 2019

Time: 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

Cost: Free

Parking: Superdome Parking Garage &

Parking Garage on Loyola Avenue

(attached to Dave & Busters)

Complimentary Parking not available; parking rates vary by property.

Click here to register!

Space is limited to 30 attendees.

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Election night snafu…

After election night snafu, St. Tammany clerk of court to seek change in how early voting is reported

Melissa R Henry.jpg

St. Tammany Parish Clerk of Court Melissa Henry

While St. Tammany Parish voters and candidates were anxiously watching the returns on election night a week ago to see whether the still-missing results of early and absentee voting would change the outcome of some hotly contested political races, St. Tammany Clerk of Court Melissa Henry and other members of the parish’s Board of Election Supervisors were trying to account for a nine-vote discrepancy in the count of mailed-in paper ballots.

The result was that the clerk’s office wasn’t able to post the final results of the Oct. 12 election until about 11 p.m.

Henry said she will ask the Legislature to revise state law so that clerks can release early voting totals when the polls close on election night and release the absentee vote totals once the results are counted and validated.

Currently, those tallies are reported together, and state law forbids reporting the much more numerous early voting totals to the Secretary of State’s Office until the mail-in ballots are validated, Henry said.

The Board of Election Supervisors includes the clerk of court, the registrar of voters, the chairs of both the Democratic and Republican parish executive committees and a governor’s appointee, Henry said.

Those five people are sequestered to tabulate the votes, and Henry said they went into lockdown about 1:30 p.m. Oct. 12. But by 7 p.m., they realized there was a nine-vote discrepancy in the count for the absentee ballots. At that point, they began a hand count, looked at the envelopes that contained the votes, and eventually decided all the paper ballots needed to be rescanned. That took until 11 p.m.

Sometimes paper ballots are not filled in properly, Henry said, and the scanners used to read them can’t read red ink, pencil or marks other than filled-in circles.

Intermittent reporting is not allowed during sequestration, she said.

The early and absentee vote counts are typically finished before 8 p.m., Henry said.

“When it comes to elections, we prioritize accuracy over speed,” she said, noting that there was something of a backlash over the late numbers from St. Tammany.

Henry said she has been in contact with the Secretary of State’s Office about pushing for a change in the state law and thinks that she’ll get support there. Some other parishes also had issues with scanners this month, she said.

She said St. Tammany Parish had a record number of people voting early for the Oct. 12 election, accounting for almost a third of the vote total, and all of those votes, made on machines, were verified before the polls closed.

The mail-in ballots accounted for less than 4% of the total, “and while equally important, should not have held up the release of early voting numbers,” Henry said.